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Undertones, The - Teenage Kicks album

Undertones, The - Teenage Kicks album
  • Performer Undertones, The
  • Title Teenage Kicks
  • Date of release 1979
  • Style Pop Rock, Punk
  • Other formats RA MPC DTS MP3 DMF AUD MOD
  • Genre Rock
  • Size MP3 1192 mb
  • Size FLAC 1760 mb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 648

Album The Undertones. Teenage Kicks Lyrics. A teenage dream's so hard to beat Every time she walks down the street Another girl in the neighbourhood Wish she was mine, she looks so good. I wanna hold her, wanna hold her tight Get teenage kicks right through the night. I'm gonna call her on the telephone Have her over cos I'm all alone I need excitement, oh I need it bad And it's the best I've ever had.

The Undertones is the 1979 debut album by The Undertones. The album was recorded at Eden Studios in Acton, West London in January 1979 and was released on 13 May that year. The original release included just one single release: "Jimmy Jimmy" and an album version of "Here Comes The Summer", which was never released as a single. A re-released version of the album (housed in an alternate sleeve), was issued in October 1979.

Features Song Lyrics for The Undertones's Teenage Kicks album. Teenage Kicks (Live In New Jersey 1980) Lyrics. 2. My Perfect Cousin Lyrics. 3. 4. True Confessions Lyrics. 5. Smarter Than You Lyrics. 6. Emergency Cases Lyrics. The Undertones Lyrics provided by SongLyrics. Do you like this album?

The Undertones - Teenage Kicks. Artist: The Undertones. Also performed by: Nouvelle Vague, Ash, Jedward, Die Toten Hosen. Album: Teenage Kicks (1978). Are teenage dreams so hard to beat? Everytime she walks down the street. Another girl in the neighbourhood. Wish she was mine, she looks so good. I wanna hold her, wanna hold her tight. Get teenage kicks right through the night. I'm gonna call her on the telephone. Have her over 'cause I'm all alone.

Lyrics to "Teenage Kicks" song by The Undertones: Are teenage dreams so hard to beat Everytime she walks down the street Another girl in the neighbour. I wanna hold her wanna hold her tight Get teenage kicks right through the night. I'm gonna call her on the telephone Have her over cos I'm all alone I need excitement oh I need it bad And it's the best, I've ever had. Are teenage dreams so hard to beat Everytime she walks down the street Another girl in the neighbourhood Wish she was mine, she looks so good. I wanna hold her wanna hold her tight Get teenage kicks right through the night

Teenage Kicks" is the debut single by Irish punk rock/new wave band The Undertones. Written in the summer of 1977 by the band's principal songwriter, John O'Neill, the song was recorded on 16 June 1978 and initially released that September upon independent Belfast record label Good Vibrations, before the band-at the time unobligated to any record label-signed to Sire Records on 2 October 1978. Here Comes the Summer.

Teenage Kicks is a brilliant and essential punk EP, introducing a band as important as the Buzzcocks, Clash and Sex Pistols, but who never received the widespread acclaim. Feargal Sharkey is the perfect singer - full of pain and neuroses. John and Damien O’Neill patch together an impenetrable wall of sound. The Undertones formed in Derry, Northern Ireland, in 1975. Belfast record shop owner Terry Hooley released this EP on his own label in September 1978. The EP was a major means of expression for the punk-new wave movement where the emphasis was on such brevity that a single would seem like a financial gyp. The EP allowed people a greater insight into a band’s musical mission.

Teenage Kicks' was the punk‑pop gem that, with a little help from John Peel, kick‑started the Undertones' career. The Undertones in 1978. From left to right: Damian O'Neill, John O'Neill, Billy Doherty (front), Feargal Sharkey and Michael Bradley. Photo: Fin Costello/Redferns. Another classic record at around this time was Television's album Marquee Moon, on which the song 'Prove It' also had that standard three‑chord progression. Sometimes, you can spend weeks on a song and then at other times you'll write it in five minutes. In the spirit of classic rock & roll, I quite literally wrote 'Teenage Kicks' in five minutes - the words, the music, everything. Still, while it may have been John Peel's favourite record, it's certainly nowhere near being one of the best records ever made.